Author Archives: Ibti

About Ibti

Just your friendly neighborhood food educator.... (http://abikeablefeast.blogspot.com)

June 27: Celebrating Current and Future Snail of Approval Winners!

To mark the opening of our next round of Snail of Approval nominations, Slow Food DC hosted a happy hour at Snail of Approval winning Urbana Dining & Drinks at the Hotel Palomar on June 27.  Urbana’s Executive Chef Ethan McKee is an active supporter of the Slow Food philosophy, keeping a 1,000-square-foot garden on the hotel’s roof as well as a beehive! All produce from the rooftop garden is used for Urbana’s dishes or by the Hotel Palomar for events.

Slow Food board members and supporters were able to sample the fruits of that  garden labor when Chef Ethan generously brought out several pizzas laden with veggies and herbs, as well as beautiful arancini stuffed with rapini sourced from Chef’s rooftop garden.

Chef Ethan also partners with Snail of Approval winner FRESHFARM’s Foodprints program, teaching cooking classes to elementary school students at nearby Francis Stevens Elementary. As recently as April, Chef Ethan and the Francis Stevens third grade class harvested spinach grown by the students and made beautiful spring ravioli. Urbana’s dedication to sustainable practices and food education are a few of the reasons why Urbana has been a Snail of Approval winner since 2016.

And now we need your help to identify other businesses that also practice and/or support the Slow Food philosophy of good, clean, and fair food! Snail of Approval nominations are now open through September 30. Anyone can nominate a food or beverage provider serving the National Capital Region that supports good, clean, and fair food in our area. You can find more information about our award criteria on our website, along with a full list of previous Snail of Approval winners.

Our sincere thanks to Chef Ethan and the entire Urbana team for their hospitality and continued commitment to the Slow Food philosophy. Now we’re looking forward to hearing from all of you, about who you think should become Snail-approved in 2018!

 

Seasonal Recipe: 4-Ingredient Stovetop Rhubarb Compote

Love the bright, alluring color of rhubarb at the farmers markets, but not sure what to do with it? Molly Wizenberg of Orangette gives us this ultra simple way to maximize the best of this spring vegetable (yes, vegetable!). In 15 minutes, you can spoon this delightful compote over ice cream or cake, or even swirl it into your morning oatmeal. This recipe appears in the June 2018 SFDC newsletter. It makes @ 2 cups.

Ingredients

  • 1 pound rhubarb, trimmed, and cut into roughly 3/4-inch chunks
  • 1/2 to 3/4 cups sugar
  • 2 Tablespoons salted butter (or use unsalted and add a pinch of salt)
  • 2 Tablespoons orange liqueur, like Cointreau or Grand Marnier

Directions

In a medium bowl, mix the rhubarb with the sugar. 

In a heavy medium saucepan over medium heat, melt the butter. When the butter has melted, add the rhubarb and sugar mixture and the orange liqueur. 

Allow to cook, undisturbed, for 2 minutes. Then gently stir and continue to cook, stirring occasionally, until the rhubarb is tender and beginning to fall apart and its juices are thick, 10 to 15 minutes. 

Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.

Seasonal Recipe: Grilled KimCheese

This recipe appeared in our April 2018 SFDC newsletter. It comes from Caitlin of Snail of Approval winning No. 1 Sons — host of our spring potluck and board meet & greet!

Ingredients:

  • bread
  • American cheese or mayo
  • two other types of cheese
  • butter
  • No. 1 Sons kimchi or sauerkraut

Directions:

  1. Get a half fistful of kimchi. Squeeze the liquid. No soggy sandwiches here! Do a coarse chop on the kimchi.
  2. Butter the outside pieces of your bread! Bread — for a decadent grilled cheese use thick slices of bread like Texas Toast. For a more “everyday” grilled cheese, I like sourdough. But any bread will do!
  3. Time to cheese your bread! We like to use three types of cheese: one slice of American for ultimate melt-iness and two other types of cheese that you like or have on hand. We often do cheddar and provolone. My mom always reprimands me for using processed cheese but it does create the most melty grilled cheese! If you are like #1 mom, you could use a bit of mayo instead.
  4. Time to layer the grilled cheese! The order is: bread, cheese, half of kimchi, American cheese, half of kimchi, cheese, bread.
  5. Put a bit of butter in a medium warm griddle. Cook till one side is brown and a bit crispy. Flip. Make sure that all cheese is melted before removing the grilled cheese!

Other options from Caitlin: “I love doing a sauerkraut grilled cheese and using a dark break and all white cheeses for a more subtle flavor compared to the Grilled Kimcheese.”

Urbana cooks up seasonal pasta with some young sous chefs

“It’s important to any good chef to use what’s grown nearby. It’s fresher and it tastes better,” Chef Ethan McKee explained to Ms. Burkett’s 3rd grade class as the group stood at the entrance to the school garden at Francis Stevens Elementary, with me, their FoodPrints* teacher, nodding enthusiastically and passing out harvest scissors. “That’s why today we’re going to use what’s growing in your garden to fill the raviolis and make the sauce for the fettuccine noodles. It’s early spring, so we have spinach and collards and fresh herbs to work with. If we were making pasta at my restaurant, Urbana, in the summertime, we’d be using lots of tomatoes. But it’s too cold for tomatoes to be growing now. Speaking of cold weather, what do you think we could use in the fall? Can anyone think of a fall vegetable?”

“Pumpkin?” a shy 3rd grader offered.

“Yes!” Urbana’s executive chef beamed, “It’s one of our most popular ravioli fillings in the fall. Nice work. Okay, now let’s get harvesting some spinach for our spring pasta!”

 

Twenty minutes later,  we were back in the FoodPrints teaching kitchen giving our hands a good scrub with soap and water before student groups dove hands first into the flour set up at the cooking stations around the room. Over the next two hours, the Snail of Approval-winning chef talked us through separating eggs, making the dough and then rolling it through a series of settings on the pasta machines he’d brought along, then cutting and filling our fresh pasta.

We were a good team: I washed and minced our garden harvest and cooked things up with lots of garlic for the ravioli filling (it was a FoodPrints class after all, and we always use lots of garlic) and the sauce while Chef Ethan moved about the room offering guidance and suggestions, pointing out how nice and smooth one group’s dough had become, complimenting another group on their patience as different students rolled it through the machine, smiling reassuringly at our parent volunteers who had never made noodles from scratch before. As Ethan dished up our freshly cooked up pasta, ours mouths all began to water, and I marveled at this wonderful 3rd year of partnership between a public elementary school, a nearby restaurant, and a local nonprofit.

Seriously, though, third graders making pasta from a pile of flour and eggs? How did it all come out?? 

Delicious!

 

*FoodPrints is the education program of FreshFarm, another DC-area Snail of Approval winner! If you’re interested in volunteering with FoodPrints classes at one of the program’s 13 DCPS partner schools, contact FreshFarm.

Seasonal Recipe: Pot roast with Kim Chi

Adapted from the Washington Post Food Section, Feb 2018. Recently taste tested and approved by SFDC board co-chair, Ibti Vincent (and her carnivorous boyfriend). It took about 3 1/2 hours to cook, but SO worth it. Best valentine’s day meal EVER.

Ingredients

  • One 2-pound boneless chuck roast (we got ours from Snail of Approval award winning farm, Smith Meadows, at the Dupont farmers market)
  • 1 1/2 tsp salt and 1/2 tsp or so of freshly ground black pepper
  • A generous glug (2 TBSP?) of olive oil
  • One 12-ounce tub of cabbage kim chi (we used some from Number One Sons, another Snail-winning purveyor at the Dupont market)
  • 1/2 cup apple cider (the non-boozy kind, available at any farmers market)
  • 2 pounds of sweet potatoes (you guessed it, from the farmers market), scrubbed and cut into large-bite chunks
Directions

Preheat the oven to 300F. Pat the meat dry and season with salt and pepper.

Heat the oil in a deep cast iron skillet until it shimmers, and sear the roast on all sides until browned. This takes about 10 minutes total.

Move the meat to a plate, then add kim chi and cider to the pan and bring to a boil, scraping any delicious meat bits from the bottom of the pan. Nestle the roast back on top, cover tightly with an ovenproof lid (or tinfoil) and bake for 90 minutes.

Uncover the pan, flip the meat over, and tuck the sweet potatoes around the edges of the pan. Re-cover and cook an additional 90 minutes, until beef and sweet potatoes are quite tender.

Scoop out servings — you may need, oh, a butter knife to cut the meat — onto plates or shallow bowls, being sure to top meat and potatoes with the delectable kim chi sauce on the bottom of the pan.

This recipe serves 4… or two people with the most anticipated leftovers ever.

Bountiful Gardening

It may still feel like winter, but gardeners in the region have our sights set on springtime….

Last weekend, many hundreds of DC-area gardeners and food activists converged on Wilson High School in Tenleytown for Rooting DC — a free, day-long conference that has been going since 2008. SFDC has been a part of this event for a number of years, with board members hosting an info table and hands-on workshops on seed saving and pickling.

At this year’s RDC, board members Mark Haskell and Ibti Vincent led a group of nearly 50 beginning gardeners through the process of planning an urban, small space garden plot. The group shared ideas and anecdotes about selecting plants and configuring small spaces to maximize food production. From basic considerations about sunlight needs to more advanced planning for succession planting and interplanting for low-input, high-yield production, we looked at ways to keep our gardens growing through all four seasons. We offered suggestions to cut down on labor and costs, and to increase the likelihood of success in the garden for beginners: using some perennials and self-seeding varieties, limiting the number of crops during times we tend to be out of the area (deep winter, summer vacation), companion planting to deter pests without chemicals, and finding friends and neighbors to help with the garden. (Who are we kidding, they are tricks useful for experienced gardeners, too.) It was a lot of fun, and we’re looking forward to using some of these strategies with our school garden partners in the coming year.

Interested in volunteering at a garden-based SFDC event and flexing your (experienced or aspiring) gardening muscles after a long winter? Sign up for our free SFDC monthly e-newsletter to keep up with events we’re planning.

Happy (almost) springtime, DC gardeners!

Seasonal Recipe: Butternut Squash and Brussels Sprouts in Agrodolce

From our SFDC Jan 2018 newsletter… Also published in Samin Nosrat’s Salt Fat Acid Heat. Serves 8-10 as a side.

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound brussels sprouts, outer leaves removed
  • 1 large butternut squash, peeled, halved, seeded and cut into 1-inch slices
  • ½ medium red onion, sliced thinly
  • olive oil
  • salt
  • ¼ cup fresh mint leaves
  • 1 clove garlic, pounded
  • ½ teaspoon red chili flakes
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • ¼ cup red wine vinegar
Directions:
  1. Preheat oven to 400°F.
  2. Season the squash lightly with salt, drizzle with olive oil and place in a single layer on 1 or 2 cookie sheets.
  3. Halve the Brussels sprouts and season lightly with salt.  Drizzle with olive oil and place in a single layer on 1 or 2 cookie sheets, cut side down.
  4. Place vegetables into the preheated oven and cook 20-24 minutes, until tender and caramelized.
  5. Meanwhile, stir together another ½ cup extra virgin olive oil, vinegar, sugar, onion, chili flakes, and garlic and season with salt.
  6. Check on the vegetables to make sure that they are browning evenly, rotating pans to control the heat.  When you are satisfied that they are cooked, remove from the oven and mix in a big bowl.  Pour marinade over and allow to sit for 20 minutes.  Taste and adjust seasoning as needed.
  7. Garnish with torn mint leaves before serving.

~recipe on Samin Nosrat’s blog here.

Seasonal Recipe: 100 Bowls Butternut Squash Lasagna

Many thanks to Snail winner 100 Bowls of Soup for hosting the wonderful tour and tasting at their location in Herndon, VA earlier this month!
Ingredients:
  • 6 lbs. Butternut Squash, peeled, quartered lengthwise, seeded, and cut into 1/8-inch-thick slices
  • 2 quarts sauce: 100 Bowls Beef Bolognese, Eggplant or Mushroom Ragout, or Ratatouille
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • Salt & pepper
  • 5 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 1 lb. mushrooms, sliced (any kind you prefer)
  • 1/2 lb. baby spinach (can be substituted with kale)
  • 15 oz. ricotta
  • 1/2 bunch parsley, finely chopped
  • 2 cups grated Parmesan
Directions:
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Working in batches, toss the butternut squash slices with olive oil, salt and pepper. Lay the squash slices on sheet trays and bake until the squash is tender but still holds its shape, about 15 mins. Repeat until all the squash is roasted. For best results, squash can be roasted a day ahead of time and cooled as they will be easier to handle and layer.
Coat a large saute pan with olive oil and add diced onions and bring the pan to a medium-high heat. Add garlic and mushrooms and season with salt and pepper. When mushrooms are soft, add spinach and saute until spinach is wilted.
In a bowl, combine the ricotta and parsley.
Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.
To assemble, place a ladleful of 100 Bowls “Sauce” (Beef Bolognese, Mushroom or Eggplant Ragout or Ratatouille) in the bottom of a 9x13inch baking dish. Spread to cover the bottom of the dish.
Arrange an even layer of the roasted squash on top of the Sauce. Be sure the squash completely covers the surface of the baking dish–this acts as the “pasta.” Cover the squash layer with more Sauce. Spread ricotta mixture over Sauce layer. Arrange an even layer of the mushroom and spinach mixture on top of the ricotta. Sprinkle with the grated parmesan. Lay another layer of butternut squash over parmesan and repeat the process until baking dish is full, ending with a top layer of squash topped with a little Sauce and parmesan.
Cover the baking dish with foil, place on a sheet tray and bake for 45 minutes. Remove the foil and bake for 10 minutes more. Remove from oven and let rest for 15-20 mins. before serving.

Seasonal Recipe: Apple Beet Carrot Salad

This seasonal recipe comes from FoodPrints — the in-school education program of Snail award winning FreshFarm. This recipe is one of the program’s most popular with students in DC public elementary schools, and will soon be featured on menus in the cafeteria of FoodPrints partner schools.

 

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 apples 
  • 2 beets 
  • 2 carrots 
  • ½ cup olive oil 
  • ¼ cup balsamic vinegar 
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • ½ to 1 teaspoon salt to taste 
  • ½ – 1 teaspoon brown sugar or maple syrup, to taste 

DIRECTIONS

Salad:

Core the apples and peel the beets. 

Grate the apples, beets and carrots with a box grater or with the grating attachment of a food processor. Put grated vegetables in a large bowl. 

Dressing:

Put remaining ingredients in a jar and shake well. This is more dressing than you will need. 

Pour in just enough dressing to coat the salad, but not enough to drench it. Mix well. Save the rest of the dressing in your fridge for other salads.

Have a great seasonal recipe you’d like to share? Send it our way — it may end up featured in an upcoming newsletter! (And if you’re interested in volunteering with FreshFarm programs, send an email to hello@freshfarm.org.) 

Seasonal Recipe: Chard Pesto

From our Sept 2017 SFDC newsletter… Recipe adapted from Swiss Chard Pesto Pasta.  Serves 4 as a sauce.

Ingredients:

  • 2 large garlic cloves
  • 2 cups packed chopped Swiss chard leaves
  • 1/2 cup chopped almonds or walnuts
  • 1/4 cup freshly grated parmesan and pecorino cheese
  • additional parmesan shaved with a vegetable peeler
  • 1/4 cup flat-leaf parsley leaves
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper

Directions:

Pulse garlic in a food processor to chop.
Add chard, nuts, cheese, and parsley and pulse until finely chopped.
Scrape down inside of bowl. Add oil, salt, and pepper and process just until smooth.

Serve with pasta/polenta/toast and shaved parmesan.

Have a great seasonal recipe you’d like to share? Send it our way — it may end up featured in an upcoming newsletter!