Author Archives: Ibti

About Ibti

Just your friendly neighborhood food educator.... (http://abikeablefeast.blogspot.com)

Seasonal recipe: Thai Curry Noodles and Veggies

Is it just us, or is soup season here?

In spite of the depth and breadth of flavors involved, this rich soup has been very popular in FoodPrints– the educational program of SFDC Snail of Approval winner FRESHFARM Markets that teaches kids in 5 DC public schools about healthy, seasonal eating and environmental stewardship.

This recipe has been modified from one that was posted on Food52.com, a wonderful NYC based website for home cooks. You can make it with shrimp or tofu, or both, and use whatever seasonal veggies you have around. Hardy winter greens are especially good in it.
Ingredients
  •  1 pound spaghetti or package of rice noodles
  • olive oil
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1 TBSP red curry paste
  • 1 TBSP madras curry powder (any curry powder will do, though)
  • 2 1/4 cups unsweetened coconut milk
  • 1 1/2 cup chicken broth or vegetable stock
  • 1 TBSP sugar
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 2 TBSP fish sauce
  • Juice from 1 lime
  • 1/2-1 pound raw, peeled shrimp or 1 pound tofu
  • A few cups of mixed veggies: Asian greens (bok choi, cabbage or tatsoi), broccoli, snow peas, carrots, etc.
  • 1 whole lime quartered for garnish
  • Chopped cilantro leaves to garnish  

Directions

  1. Cook the noodles according to the directions, drain it, toss it with a little oil to keep it from sticking together, and set aside. (If using skinny rice noodles, I don’t even cook them, but instead place a small pile at the bottom of each serving bowl.)
  2. Add 2 tablespoons of oil to the cleaned pot.
  3. Combine garlic, curry paste, madras curry powder, turmeric and cumin. Add the garlic and spices to the pot and stir, cooking just until fragrant.
  4. Add the stock, fish sauce, sugar and coconut milk. Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat to a simmer.
  5. Simmer for about 20 minutes to get the flavors to meld.
  6. While the soup is simmering, chop the green veggies you have chosen to use and either steam them or sauté for a few minutes with a little garlic in olive oil or sesame oil.
  7. After 20 minutes, add the shrimp and/or tofu. Cook just until the shrimp is done, or until the tofu is heated through.
  8. Turn the heat to high. Add 1 tablespoon lime juice and as soon as the soup boils, turn it off.
  9. Put noodles in large bowls and top with ladlefuls of the hot soup. Put cooked veggies on top and garnish with a splash of lime juice and sprinkle of cilantro.

We try to feature a delicious new recipe in each newsletter. If you would like to have one shared with the SFDC community, please send it to  info@slowfooddc.org and we’ll see what we can do.

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Seasonal recipe: Scallion and Kale Pancakes

Ever had savory pancakes? Oh, you’ve been missing out! This recipe comes from SFDC member, Kathryn Warnes — accomplished cook and founder of Taste of Place. Kathryn prepared these delicious pancakes at theBloomingdale Farmers’ Market earlier this month, and market shoppers eagerly asked for the recipe…. So get yourself to your nearest farmers’ market to pick up ingredients and wow your holiday guests with these soon!

We try to feature a delicious new recipe in each newsletter If you would like to have one shared with the SFDC community, please send it to info@slowfooddc.org and we’ll see what we can do.

Serves 6 as a side or appetizer

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups flour, plus more for dusting
  • 1/2 cup warm water
  • sesame oil for frying
  • 4 scallions, thinly sliced
  • 6-8 large kale leaves, chopped

    (save kale stems for another use, like in a stirfry)

  • kosher salt

Directions

In a large bowl, mix flour and water together to form a smooth dough. Add flour as needed if the dough is sticky.

Knead dough for 5 minutes, then let rest for 30 minutes in an oiled bowl covered with a towel.

Divide the dough in half. On a floured surface, roll out one half into a 1-inch thick rope. Cut this dough rope into 2-inch sections, then use a rolling pin (or if you are at the farmers’ market and forget your rolling pin, the sesame oil bottle works pretty well, too) to roll each section into a small circle.

Lightly brush each circle with sesame oil. Sprinkle on the scallions, kale, and salt.

Roll up the topped circles and then coil them like a snail (how slow-food-like!). Use your rolling pin to roll each snail into a flat circle again. Stack your uncooked pancakes between sheets of parchment or wax paper. (You can freeze them for later cooking at this point, if you like.)

Heat 2 TBSP of oil in a skillet. Cook the pancakes over medium high heat until golden brown — about 3 minutes on each side — then serve warm with soy sauce for dipping.

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Seasonal recipe: Fall Fig Chutney  

This recipe and history lesson come from SFDC board member/chef/food historian, Mark Haskell. (We try to feature a delicious new recipe in each newsletter If you would like to have one shared with the SFDC community, please send it to info@slowfooddc.org and we’ll see what we can do.)

Chutney, according to the dictionary, is a spicy condiment made of fruits or vegetables with vinegar, spices, and sugar, originating in south Asia or India. It became very popular among foreigners during the British Raj in Asia, and was then widely adopted in England, Europe and the United States.

Chutney is almost always used as accompaniment to a main dish to add a sweet and sour or pickled element to a dish, and may be cooked or uncooked in its preparation. There are hundreds of different chutneys, and may be used either to be soothing by using more coconut and yogurt, or more herbal with fresh coriander and mint, aromatic with cinnamon and cardamom, spicy with lime and chiles, or sweeter with mango, apples and raisins.

During the late summer and fall around DC and the Chesapeake we have lots of figs and chile peppers ready to harvest. My Virginia aunts always used seeded red cayennes for their fig and plum chutneys, I prefer green chiles, serranos or cayennes.

 

Fig Chutney 

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 cups white vinegar
  • 1 cup of sugar or honey
  • 1 onion, roughly chopped
  • 3-4 cloves of garlic, peeled and crushed
  • 1/4 cup, peeled chopped fresh ginger
  • 2 teaspoons yellow mustard seeds
  • 1 lemon, zested
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 2 tablespoons salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • Chile peppers, fresh, chopped** you have to use your own judgement, amount of heat you can handle, or add later **
  • 2 pounds firm, underripe fresh figs, rinsed, stems removed and halved

Directions

Combine the vinegar, sugar/honey, onion, garlic, ginger, mustard seeds, lemon zest, cinnamon stick, salt, allspice, cloves and chiles and bring to a boil.

Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook until mixture is greatly reduced by more than half, forming a thick syrup.

Add the figs and simmer gently until the figs are soft and most of the fig liquid has evaporated, about 30-40 minutes.

Allow chutney to cool to room temperature before bottling or canning. The chutney may be stored in the refrigerator sealed in an airtight container for several weeks or months.

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Seasonal recipe: Zucchini Chocolate Chip Muffins

It’s summer, and that means if you garden or shop at farmers’ markets you probably have zucchini coming out of your ears. We’ve got a solution for some of your zucchini riches, and it involves chocolate.

You only need to heat up the kitchen for a little while to have snacks/breakfast for the week with this tasty and relatively healthy recipe from SFDC board member and food educator, Ibti Vincent.

We try to feature a delicious new recipe in every newsletter. If you would like to have one shared with the SFDC community, send it to info@slowfooddc.org and we’ll see what we can do.

 

CHOCOLATE CHIP ZUCCHINI MUFFINS
Makes 18 muffins (because you will suddenly find that you need more than a dozen once friends start tasting these)


Ingredients

  • 2 ¼ cups flour (all-purpose, whole wheat pastry, or all-purpose gluten-free)
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 1 ½ tsp baking soda
  • 1 ½ tsp ground cinnamon
  • ¾ tsp salt
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • ½ cup apple sauce
  • ¼ cup vegetable or olive oil
  • ¼ cup milk
  • juice from 1 lemon
  • 1 ½ tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 ½ cups shredded zucchini
  • ¾ cup chocolate chips
  • handful of nuts (optional)

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350F.
  2. Generously grease 18 muffin cups (or use paper cup liners).
  3. In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. These are your “dry” ingredients.
  4. In a separate bowl, combine eggs, apple sauce, vegetable oil, milk, lemon juice and vanilla. These are your “wet” ingredients.
  5. Stir wet ingredients into dry ingredients.
  6. Gently stir in zucchini, chocolate chips, and nuts (if using).
  7. Fill prepared muffin cups, splitting batter evenly between them.
  8. Bake 20-25 minutes, until a toothpick comes out clean.
  9. Loosen muffins then turn out onto a wire rack to cool.
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Seasonal recipe: Summer Veggie Tacos!

This recipe is from SFDC board member and food educator, Ibti Vincent. It was recently taste-tested and approved by 3rd, 4th, and 5th graders at a summer camp cooking session. This is a great, infinitely adaptable recipe that uses the best summer goodies at your local farmers’ market (or school garden, if you happen to manage one over the summer).

Be warned: the tacos have a tendency to be so popular you will probably want to make a double batch so that you can have one yourself after your kids and the neighbors’ kids eat the first dozen….

We try to feature a delicious new recipe in every newsletter. If you would like to have one shared with the SFDC community, send it to info@slowfooddc.org and we’ll see what we can do.

 

INGREDIENTS

  • Olive oil
  • 2 cups fresh white or yellow corn kernels (cut from 3-4 ears of corn)
  • 1 cup chopped onion
  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled and finely chopped
  • 4 medium tomatoes, roughly chopped
  • 3 medium zucchini, diced small
  • 1 cup canned black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 tsp fresh oregano
  • 1 cup fresh spinach or swiss chard, washed and chopped
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 8 warm corn tortillas
  • ¼ cup fresh tomato or tomatillo salsa
  • 8 tsp grated Monterey Jack cheese (or queso fresco)

DIRECTIONS

Heat 2 TBSP oil in a large skillet over high heat. Toast corn 5 minutes, stirring; season with salt. Remove corn; set aside.

Heat 2-3 tsp oil in skillet. Cook onion, stirring, until it caramelizes, 5 minutes.

Add garlic; cook 1-2 minutes.

Add tomatoes; cook 10 minutes.

Add zucchini; cook until tender, 10 to 12 minutes; season with salt and pepper to taste.

Add corn, beans, oregano, and chard/spinach. Cook 3 minutes.

Split filling among tortillas; top each with salsa and 1 tsp cheese.

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Get mashed

Many thanks to Brooklyn Brewery for bringing their beer-food-arts awesomeness back to DC for the summer 2014 edition of the MASH tour!

This past Friday, I had the good fortune to secure a seat at the Slow Supper, featuring four delicious courses cooked up by the ingenious Chefs Andrew and Jacob, and perfectly paired with limited edition Brooklyn Brewery beers. (In retrospect, it was tough to pick a favorite course, as they were all so good, but I’ve a feeling I’m going to be seeking out Brooklyn’s cuvee noire — the delectable, chocolaty brew we enjoyed with dessert and which I’ve been daydreaming about ever since.) Set in an airy warehouse space in the up-and-coming Union Market area of NoMa, more than a hundred other foodies joined me and fellow SFDC board members Amanda and Rob at the dinner that benefited our local Slow Food chapter.

The dinner marked nearly the end of a week packed with fun, mostly beer-themed events, ranging from farm tours to tastings to homebrew tip sharing all around our nation’s capital. See more photos from various MASH DC events on our facebook page. And keep your eyes peeled for the next time Brooklyn Brewery comes through town, ’cause it’s sure to be delicious….

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Seasonal recipe: (Almost Summertime) Asparagus Salad 

This recipe is from SFDC board member and farmers’ market maven, Ibti Vincent. It was recently taste-tested (and approved) at the 14&U farmers’ market chef table. This is a great, infinitely adaptable recipe that is a lovely picnic or potluck item….

We try to feature a delicious new recipe in every newsletter. If you would like to have one shared with the SFDC community, send it to info@slowfooddc.org and we’ll see what we can do….

INGREDIENTS

Salad:

  • 2 bunches asparagus, stems removed, thinly sliced on a diagonal
  • 2 scallions, ½ small red onion, or 1 shallot, finely chopped
  • 1 small yellow squash or 1 fennel bulb, finely sliced (optional)
  • freshly grated Parmesan cheese, crumbled feta, or chevre (optional)
  • handful of hazelnuts, chopped (optional)

Vinaigrette:

  • ½ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • juice of 1-2 lemons, to taste
  • 1 garlic clove, peeled and minced
  • pinch of sugar
  • a handful of fresh herbs (parsley, mint, chives, etc), minced
  • salt & freshly ground black pepper, to taste

DIRECTIONS

Whisk together the olive oil, lemon, garlic, sugar, and herbs, seasoning with salt and pepper to taste.

Stir in the salad ingredients and toss gently to combine.

 

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Seasonal recipe: Homemade Apple Granola 

Spring is here, but it’ll still be a little while before we have non-apple seasonal fruit options at the farmers’ market. But there are other ways to enjoy apples besides yet another apple pie. This recipe is from registered dietitian, food blogger, and newcomer to the SFDC board, Amanda Terillo.

We try to feature a delicious new recipe in every newsletter. If you would like to have one shared with the SFDC community, send it to info@slowfooddc.org and we’ll see what we can do….

INGREDIENTS
  • 2 cups rolled oats (soaked overnight)
  • ½ cup pieces of cashews or almonds (soaked overnight)
  • ½ cup pieces of walnuts
  • ½ cup raisins
  • ½ cup maple syrup
  • 2 apples grated (use a cheese grater)
  • 1 tablespoon of cinnamon
  • pinch of salt
DIRECTIONS

Preheat oven to 325F.

Mix all ingredients into a large bowl.

Spread a thin layer on a baking sheet.

Cook the granola for 20-25 minutes until the oats are golden brown.

Store in an airtight container and enjoy!

 

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Taking in the Sights and Smells of Union Kitchen

Last Sunday, March 30, Slow Food DC joined former Board Chair Kathryn Warnes of Taste of Place for a tour and demo of the behind-the-scenes activity at Union Kitchen food incubator.  Located in a 7,300 square foot warehouse in NE DC, Union Kitchen offers a space for over 50 small local food businesses to grow and thrive while limiting startup costs by providing shared space, equipment, amenities, and administrative services.  General Manager Mike Darman welcomed our group in to the building on a cold, rainy day, inviting us to enjoy the warmth and good smells of active cooks in the kitchen!  In the communal meeting area, Mike gave us a thorough introduction to the incubator, answering all of our questions about the application and vetting process and telling us all about the many supportive programs that they offer to their members – benefits of being part of a sharing community of food entrepreneurs.  He then led us on a tour of the warehouse where we could smell kombucha fermenting, watch chickpeas being roasted in garlic and rosemary, listen to the whir of mixers whipping up cupcake batter, see juice pulp being squeeze, and bask in the damp mustiness of a hand-made sausage curing closet.

From there were met up with Chris Johnson and James Brosch, owners of Cured DC, and their assistant Nick for an in depth one-on-one demonstration of how they make their Toscana sausage.  They walked us through the whole process from selecting the best cut of meat, then cutting, prepping, and grinding it to adding the right amount of fat, spices, and wine, encasing the mixture and preparing it to be cured slowly for many months before being ready to slice, eat and simply enjoy.  Which is what we did to round out our afternoon – slicing thin samples of spicy boar sausage and herbaceous pork Toscana.

We left eager to come back soon – perhaps a taste of Union Kitchen later this year with a sampling from each of our favorite Made in DC foods!

Post contributed by SFDC board co-chair, Sarah McKinley

 

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April 27: SFDC spices up Wangari Gardens

Join Slow Food DC and local community members at Wangari Gardens on Sunday, April 27 to expand the communal herb garden at one of our favorite local community gardens. Planting and garden work will go from 12-2pm, followed by a potluck. We’ll supply the plants, tools, water, and plates/utensils!

We’ll be planting a variety of herbs, along with some Ark of Taste hot peppers, including Fish Chili Peppers — an African American heirloom variety brought to this country from either the Caribbean or Africa by enslaved peoples to the many plantations that surrounded the early Chesapeake Bay settlements. The name Fish Pepper refers to its common use with seafood through the Chesapeake region. The plant has beautiful variegated leaves and seemingly no two fish chiles have the same coloration or variegation in their stripes. (Pretty cool, no? Learn more about these unique, heirloom peppers and the Ark of Taste project from master gardeners and SFDC board members, Mark Haskell and Ibti Vincent.)

WHEN: Sunday, April 27 from 12-3pm.

WHERE: Wangari Gardens (Kenyon Street, Irving Street, and Park Place NW) — just north of Washington Hospital and the McMillan Reservoir.

WHAT TO BRING: Yourself, a water bottle, and a potluck item to share (salad, appetizer, baked good, etc).

 

 

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