Category Archives: News

Committee Fair: November 6th

As always, there are many ways for you to become involved with Slow Food DC!

We will be holding a very important committee fair on Sunday, November 6, from 1:30 to 3:00 pm at the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library. Conveniently located near Metro Center and Chinatown Metro stations, the MLK Library is DC Public Library’s main branch.

What: Slow Food DC Committee Fair
When: 1:30-3:00 pm
Where: Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW, Washington, DC 20001

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What’s in season: KALE!

I don’t know quite how bananas got the reputation as being Nature’s Perfect Food. In my mind, that title should go to kale. Raw, massaged, steamed, stir-fried, chopped into soups, stews, quiches… kale is infinitely adaptable, crazy healthy, and surprisingly inexpensive. And you can find it at your local farmers’ market or grocery store RIGHT NOW. Here are a few ideas on how to prepare kale, in case you need a little help getting started…. Continue reading

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Food Day Activities: Organize Lunch

Food Day is generating a lot of talk out there. Just search the event lists on the Food Day website and you can see there’s plenty of ways to become involved. The official day is Monday October 24th, but no one will chastise you for doing this on any day.

Here at Slow Food DC, we encourage you to take a more personal route. Instead of doing something out of the ordinary, we want you to do something very ordinary: eat lunch. If you’re like me, you have to be at work on Monday the 24th. But who better than the people you work with to share the idea of good, clean fair food? The best part is, you can demonstrate by bringing something to share.

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Blog Action Day: Apples

On this Blog Action Day, I hope you will remember one thing, and that is to enjoy food. No meaningful change will ever come to our food system until we reframe our approach to food, and get back to the simple enjoyments of eating quality food.

Clockwise from the top: Rhode Island Green, Splendor, Liberty, Golden Russet, Red Gravenstein, and Bramley's Seedling. Goldrush is in the middle

Yesterday I went to the Distillery Lane Ciderworks and enjoyed a beautiful if windy day in historic fields a few miles north of the Potomac river. Where Union and Confederate soldiers marched 150 years ago, this farm is growing dozens of varieties of apples, many of them heirloom breeds. From British cider apples to Heritage Americans and a few modern cultivars, the tour group sampled the different hard cider produced on the farm and chose apples to take home. Continue reading

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Food Day(s)

Feeling like there’s been more discussion about food recently?  If it feels like October is all about food, you are not far from the mark.  From school lunches to hunger issues, many organizations are using October as a time to bring food issues to the forefront of our attention.  The Center for Science in the Public Interest has therefore created Food Day on October 24th, which joins other observances such as World Food Day, this year’s Blog Action Day, National Farm to School Month,  and National School Lunch Week. Continue reading

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Dear Apple Cider, sorry I took you for granted

Apple cider. I took you for granted.

This week at school I handed out some local apple cider (non alcoholic of course) samples that were donated to the kitchen. Being October and all, I thought it would be a nice treat to the students. What I failed to realize was how many kids HAD NEVER HAD APPLE CIDER BEFORE! Many people, and a certain demographic, knows all about apple cider, plans trips around apple cider making and purchasing, and goes gaga over apple cider.

Apple cider, a beverage produced from apples that would not be best consumed raw, is an enjoyable drink; a drink I grew up on, seasonally of course. Many kids don’t know what apple cider is. They can tell you all 100 plus products of the CoCa Cola company but they can’t name a natural, historic, beverage that is made naturally at this time every year since the beginning of time. It’s sad. But, the apple cider glass is still have full here and so despite being shocked, we used it as a golden opportunity to talk to the students during those few breakfast meal periods about apples, seasonal produce, apple cider making, and had them try it. Did everyone like it? No. But, some did, and some walked away liking something new they had never tried before. That’s what cooking is all about, right!?

Happy fall! And happy cider drinking.

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KEEP IT REAL! cook something

I need to set higher goals.

In my last post I summarized my time in school food service over the last few years and ended with a goal of meeting the First Lady.

I met her this past Saturday.

Now what?

I’ll tell you what!

Home ec.

Michelle wants to bring it back. Well, kinda sorta.

As I was preparing salad greens with Mrs. Obama at DC Central Kitchen, we spoke about (among many things in the twenty minutes I had with her) the need to educate children. Children are coming to school and being raised in an era where the common utensil is a spork, where the average lunch period is 16 minutes long, and the food is much less satisfying. We need to fix that. We need to bring back the pride associating cooking with keepin it real.

We have, in many senses, lost our way in food. We have a huge grassroots and national movement going on that has forced us to think about where our food comes from, who grew it, and how it got to us. But we now need to take that and bring it to the next step; we need to learn how to cook again. Michelle Obama could not be more right.

It’s not a lot. It’s boiling water, blanching, searing, marinating, grilling. It’s salting food, it’s making a dressing, and it’s maybe what you leave a Sunday afternoon for in your family. No one is asking anyone to be a chef. But food can and will bring people together, so why not start it on Sundays when the family is around? Why not open a cookbook or even watch the Food Network together? Cooking, after all, should be fun, not terrifying.

Let me know your thoughts on cooking with your schedule… What challenges do you face in trying to cook at home? And with your kids? What would YOU need to want to cook more??!

Michelle Obama faces the same challenges you all face when raising children to eat in order to understand the power of food, not just eating healthy. She gets that someone has to make those choices for themselves and she wants to help facilitate that connection….but I guarantee you, she wont be using the words “home economics” when she rolls out that plan.

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